Jemima Levick

Meet Stellar Quines Artistic Director & Chief Executive – Jemima Levick

Jemima was appointed Artistic Director and Chief Executive of Stellar Quines in May 2016. Prior to that, she served as Artistic Director and as Associate Director at Dundee Rep Theatre for seven years. She trained at Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh and also on a Scottish Arts Council Director Traineeship.

She has won and been nominated for a number of awards and directed more than 18 productions at the Rep, including Great Expectations, The Glass Menagerie, Time and the Conways, The Tempest, The Elephant Man and Beauty and the Beast. 

As a freelance as a director and producer she has worked with a number of companies, including the Royal Lyceum Theatre, The National Theatre of Scotland, Perissology Theatre Productions, Borderline, Grid Iron Theatre Company, Traverse Theatre and Paines Plough.

Most recently she directed the critically acclaimed The 306: Day and this summer will direct her first Fringe show for the company The Last Queen of Scotland.

Stellar Quines & Glasgow Women’s Library launch Play Amnesty

Stellar Quines and Glasgow Women’s Library have launched a Play Amnesty to showcase female playwriting talent.

The Play Amnesty is a call out for plays written by women. As we both champion female voices we are asking people to donate copies of plays and scripts written by women that have been published, produced and/or performed for a new drama shelf.

To reflect the rich diversity of the Glasgow Women’s Library’s collection plays are sought from female writers of any nationality. The Library is particularly keen to receive plays that have a female focus, or strong roles for women, and writing from the Trans community and Women of Colour. Plays not written in the English language are also welcomed.

Plays can be posted to or dropped off at Glasgow Women’s Library or donated at one of our Amnesty Drop Off points.

Alongside the public Amnesty we will be working with Glasgow Women’s Library to ensure culturally diverse voices are represented in their collection of plays, identifying women playwrights and sourcing plays. The plays will be available to members and will be used by the Library’s Drama Queens Group for readings.

FULL STORY

Stellar Quines & Glasgow Women’s Library Play Amnesty

Stellar Quines and Glasgow Women’s Library have launched a Play Amnesty to showcase female playwriting talent.

The Play Amnesty is a call out for plays written by women. As we both champion female voices we are asking people to donate copies of plays and scripts written by women that have been published, produced and/or performed for a new drama shelf.

To reflect the rich diversity of the Glasgow Women’s Library’s collection plays are sought from female writers of any nationality. The Library is particularly keen to receive plays that have a female focus, or strong roles for women, and writing from the Trans community and Women of Colour. Plays not written in the English language are also welcomed.

Alongside the public Amnesty we will be working with Glasgow Women’s Library to ensure culturally diverse voices are represented in their collection of plays, identifying women playwrights and sourcing plays. The plays will be available to members and will be used by the Library’s Drama Queens Group for readings. The project has the support of two of Scotland’s leading playwrights Linda McLean and Lynda Radley who have commited to donate their work to the drama shelf.

Linda Maclean, playwright:

When I was growing up I didn’t know that it was possible to be a playwright and a woman and alive. And while I comfort myself that things are changing I often meet people who cannot name a female playwright. I am so glad Stellar Quines and Glasgow Women’s Library is having a Play Amnesty.  It is such a positive step towards recording the many plays by women, living and dead, who have contributed to the body of Scottish Theatre, and who deserve to shine.

Lynda Radley, playwright:

I am delighted to donate copies of my published work to Glasgow Women’s’ Library, an organisation I have been aware of since I first moved to Glasgow eleven years ago. Glasgow Women’s Library provides excellent tailored resources including safe spaces for women to learn and to grow, resurrects fascinating local her stories and curates a programme of work that celebrates and challenges. Their values mirror those of Stellar Quines, an organisation I have also had to pleasure of being nurtured by, and I feel honoured that my work will sit alongside that of other female playwrights in Glasgow Women’s Library. 

The Amnesty closed on the 28th February with the drama shelf is to be unveiled on the 8th March to mark International Women’s Day.

Drama Shelf Launch

Glasgow Women’s Library

Wednesday 8th March, 2.00 – 4.30pm – Free – all ages welcome.

Tea and cake served from 1.30pm

A launch event at Glasgow Women’s Library will include readings by the Library’s Drama Queens group, and workshop sessions with playwright’s Linda McLean and Lynda Radley and a discussion and Q&A with Stellar Quines Artistic Director Jemima Levick.

Come along and join in championing and celebrating the stories of women and girls.

Thanks to Playwright’s Studio, Tron Theatre, Traverse Theatre, Dundee Rep Theatre, Shetland Arts & Horsecross Arts for supporting the project and collection of plays during the Play Amnesty.

 

You can still post plays & scripts to:

Play Amnesty 

Glasgow Women’s Library, 23 Landressy St, Glasgow, G40 1BP

 

Play Amnesty Press Release

Pippa Murphy

How would you describe your current job and what do you like best about it?

I’m a Composer, Sound Designer, arranger and lecturer. I work with many different people in many different art forms. I love the variety of projects I work on, and the diversity of the people I work with.

What was your first ever job?

Little known to many… My first proper job was as a Customer Development Manager at the Forensic Science Service as it became an Executive Agency of the Home Office. The Home Office was keen for the FSS to take on forensic work from corporate companies and barristers representing the accused. I worked full-time there for 3 years whilst I was studying for my PhD in composition. I had a team of 10 and learnt many skills that have equipped me for life including people management, contact management, marketing, sales and customer liaison. After 3 years I left to move up to Scotland, complete my PhD and become a freelance composer. I haven’t had a salaried job since.

Has there been a particular person or an opportunity that you feel has made the most difference to your career?

In 2001 I was lucky enough to be involved in a creative team who went to Iran for 4 weeks to lead a series of theatre and film workshops with students at Tehran University with the British Council. Together we created 4 pieces, 1 led by design, 1 by music, 1 by text and 1 by movement. It was an intense but unforgettably beautiful experience working alongside 40 incredibly dedicated Iranian students. We had a very strict set of parameters to work within and a list of what we could and couldn’t do creatively. Women are not permitted to sing solo, so I created a scenario that the lead woman was mad and worked with sonic utterances and melodic gobbledygook vocal (song) lines to enable a female musical presence in the show. It passed the censors because it wasn’t ‘musical’.

I’ve never since been part of something so passionate and raw.

What do you like the best about working within the arts?

I love the richness of creating music, theatre, dance and film with others; discussing, distilling, nourishing and bringing something alive to share with others.

What advice would you give emerging female musicians/composers in the arts today?

Be yourself, get to know your peers, be prolific, keep listening, share your thoughts with kindness and work with as many different people as you can.

Who would your Stellar Quine of the month be and why?

Many of my Stellar Quines are already on the list but I’d like to suggest Dana McLeod (now at the British Council) for her dedication to presenting all art forms in many different cultural and geographical landscapes and for her unsung gift of being the wise instigator of many life-long creative partnerships across Scotland and beyond.

For more information on Pippa’s work go to pippamurphy.com

Listen to examples from the score Pippa has composed for The Air That Carries the Weight.

Rebecca Sharp – the moment I knew I was on the right track

The Air That carries the Weight

Ahead of rehearsals starting for her new work, The Air That Carries the Weight, on 22nd February, we asked Rebecca Sharp about how she made the progression with her script from Rehearsal Room 25 in October 2014 to the final version.

This is the main stage production following on from the Rehearsal Room – how did the feedback from Rehearsal Room help form the final script?

RS: When we had the Rehearsal Room in October 2014, the script was very young and there wasn’t much of it! I’d done a lot of research leading up to that stage, and was almost tentative to really commit to the writing process. I felt a sense of responsibility when writing about a real person (Marion Campbell), and in dealing with such huge, weighty issues – death, fate, friendship, interconnectedness… But what was lovely from that RR experience was the genuine warmth and interest that came from the audience – real interest in these characters; Yvonne’s illness and the weight Isobel carries after she’s gone. I was touched by how openly people connected with the ideas and shared their thoughts on some pretty sensitive subjects. Neal Ascherson was also there at that RR, and that gave me such a boost! He knew Marion well, so it was almost like having her there in the room. I’m a huge admirer of Neal’s work (his book Stone Voices had been hugely influential), and to have his encouragement meant a great deal to say the least. He looked over during one of the ‘Marion’ scenes and gave me a smile and a nod, and it was such a relief – I swear I’ll hold on to that moment forever! I knew I was on the right track and that gave me the confidence to carry on. The experience of working with the actors and with Muriel in that concentrated space of time also really helped to distil a lot of ideas, which gave me clear impetus for what to do next.

Do you feel that The Air That Carries the Weight has moved on from your original idea?

RS: Yes – my initial thought had been to combine an original story with an adaptation of Marion’s novel The Dark Twin. Not only is The Dark Twin an incredibly dark and twisty novel, so that it almost defies adaptation, but I also came to realise that a mere adaptation wouldn’t do justice to the ideas that were at stake. The relationships between characters started to take over – Yvonne/Isobel, Yvonne/Marion, Marion/Mary – and I realised that I could explore the themes of the novel while in fact barely mentioning it. In May 2015 I spent a week staying at Marion’s cottage at Kilberry, and also visited the Castle, invited by Marion’s relatives John and Charmian Campbell. That made everything more personal – and revealed even more connections. I just started to feel everything so much more clearly, and followed those instincts, rather than sticking rigidly to an initial outline. There have been a few surprises along the way – themes that have popped up when I didn’t expect them. I always take that as a good sign – that as a writer, I’m not putting myself in the way of the work becoming what it wants to be.

How have the discussions between yourself and Muriel Romanes who is directing the production influenced changes in the story and the characters?

RS: Massively – Muriel has been so invested in this project since our very first conversations. The play has touched on themes and feelings for us both personally, and I think that has shaped how we’ve worked. We’ve talked a lot about Argyll and the Highlands, experiences of places and the capacity of those landscapes to evoke powerful feelings and memories. A personal anecdote of Muriel’s has actually ended up in the script, with permission! Muriel is also great at cracking the whip when it’s needed – I was struggling to sharpen up the story, with all these huge themes swimming around my head, I was looking for that balance… so having her advice as I edited really helped, always bringing it back to story and audience experience.

How did you feel when you saw the set design by John Byrne and how he had created the world of Yvonne’s cottage in Argyll?

RS: I honestly had to pinch myself – I’m such a huge fan of his, it’s embarrassing. But for the work as well – I’d been carrying this story, these characters, this location around in my head literally for years – and to see it take form not just on the page but as a three dimensional object, was a truly magical moment. I love seeing how other artists work, so to see Yvonne’s cottage from John’s point-of-view, was amazing. He’d picked up on such tiny details in the script, in such clever and subtle ways. It also really helped me to finish writing the final draft, as I could now envisage the stage more clearly and how the actors might move around the set. It also just brought me even closer to the characters and what they’re going through, I wanted to live there with them.

Will you be involved in rehearsals and are you looking forward to hearing your script at the read-through?

RS: I’ll be there for the first full week to start with – it’s so important to be with the actors and hear their voices, especially as this is our first meeting with the final script. I say ‘final’ – I’ll be making changes throughout that first week, according to what we discover as we work through it. I’m not precious in that way – I want the actors (and everyone) to tell me where it flows and where it doesn’t, as they’re the ones up on stage. I say this because I’m aware that this text is quite dense and abstract in places – and we have to make that work for audiences, or there’s no point. I’m excited, and also ready for the challenge. Nothing worth doing comes easy! I also can’t wait to hear Pippa Murphy’s score – sound will play such a huge role in creating the different worlds that the story moves between. Creating those emotional and psychological spaces for the audience is crucial if we’re asking them to join us in the story – so it’s a big job, but that’s why we’re all here.

The Air That Carries the Weight opens at the Traverse Theatre 24 March

To book click here

Jenny Sealey

How would you describe your current job and what do you like best about it?

I’ve been Artistic Director of Graeae Theatre Company since 1997. Graeae was founded in 1980 to address the lack of opportunity for Deaf and disabled people in the performing arts. It is a company founded on the desire to combat social injustice and is fuelled by a passion for inclusion and the need to campaign for artistic, practical and functional access within the arts.

I love my job which is why I have been with Graeae for so many years. There is still so much to learn about artistic access (over the years we have coined the term the ‘Aesthetics of Access’ which is the practice of integrating sign language, captions and audio description into the fabric of all our productions) and there is still much to be done to challenge and change the general perception of who has the right to be a performer, writer, director etc. Our mission statement is ‘to boldly place Deaf and disabled artists centre-stage’ and until there is an equal playing field, so that Deaf and disabled artists are constantly gracing the many stages across the country, Graeae will continue to advocate this mission.

What was your first ever job?

My first Saturday job was washing up in The Peppermill in Nottingham. We got £8 and that had to last the week.

Has there been a particular person or an opportunity that you feel has made the most difference to your career?

My dance teacher Nora Morrison (Morrison School of Dancing in Nottingham) and the late Marielaine Church (Clarendon College 6th Form, Nottingham) who were both inspirational and pushed me to believe I could have a career in theatre.

What do you like the best about working within theatre?

I think I have the best job in the world working for Graeae as it is not just a theatre company; we make theatre that matters and use theatre to advocate and campaign for equality and a right for Deaf and disabled actors to be centre stage. I get to work with some of the most extraordinary talent that the mainstream doesn’t even think to consider. I also love that we have pioneered new theatrical narratives through exploring access as an artistic aesthetic and that many other companies are following suit. I am proud of the fact that as a company we are ever evolving, learning and thinking outside of the box.

What has been your favourite theatre production?

I am proud of all the productions I have done. Some have been infinitely more successful (Peeling, Blasted, Bent, Two, Diary of an An Action Man, Reasons to be Cheerful, The Threepenny Opera, The Iron Man and currently Blood Wedding) than others BUT each production is a huge learning curve and all have made their mark in Graeae’s history as being different, daring and pushing the boundaries of possibility.

What advice would you give emerging female practitioners in the arts today?

It is essential that emerging Deaf and disabled female actors are confident about who they are, what their access requirements are and what their USP (Unique Selling Point) is. They need to be aware of the social model of disability and have that belief that they can be cast in all manner of roles. They need to be bloody good actors and better than their non disabled peers because it is a tough, prejudiced world out there.

Who would your Stellar Quine of the month be and why?

I would like to nominate my Training and Learning Manager Jodi Alissa Bickerton because she is inspiring the next generation of very young disabled girls and telling them they can reach for the moon.  I would also like to nominate EJ Raymond who plays the mother in Blood Wedding. She is a joy to direct is and is a hugely important role model within the Deaf arts community in Scotland.

Jenny Sealey MBE is Artistic Director of Graeae Theatre Company. Her current production of Blood Wedding is on national tour and visiting the Traverse Theatre Edinburgh from 8 -11 April. Visit www.graeae.org for more information.

Faith Liddell

How would you describe the work that you do?

Basically, it’s all about collaboration. I work with the 12 major festivals in Edinburgh on their joint strategic ambition working across programme investment, international working, marketing, innovation and environmental practice. In order to this, we collaborate in turn with a whole range of creative and funding partners in our city, in Scotland and indeed across the world. It’s a wonderful job that has constantly evolved over the last 8 years.

What do you like best about it?

Keeping great company and the constant, intense learning involved in what still feels like an endless experiment.

What do you consider your best work and why?

There are individual productions and projects I’ve produced or created and of course, there is a visceral thrill in seeing these coming together – which probably has something to do with the fear that comes before. However, I do feel the scale and depth of this work with the festivals and the fact that a lot of our approaches have rolled out into the wider cultural or tourism sectors, has been profoundly satisfying – which probably has something to do with the fact that it is so bloody challenging getting to that collaborative sweet spot.

What was your first ever job?

My first job was in a bar and my first job in the arts was in a bar, the Traverse Theatre when it was still in the Grassmarket.

What was the contact/opportunity/job offer that you feel has made the most difference to your career?

Well, weirdly it might have been that one. When I was working in the Traverse Bar, the job of Marketing Manager came up and I wrote cheeky letter to Ian Brown and Ann Bonnar who were running the theatre at the time and said I wasn’t really a bar person but a market research wiz and that, working on the front line, I knew more about their audiences than they did. They interviewed me and it was one of the most humiliating experiences of my life but it got me noticed and when the Box Office Manager job came up, Katie Stuart (currently with the FST) offered me the job. She didn’t even ask if I could count! It was my entry into the professional world of the arts, my life’s work and the friendships that continue to sustain me.

What’s the biggest opportunity that you missed or wished you had taken up but didn’t? 

Do you know, I’m mostly with Edith Piaf on that one. I tend to be very clear about what I need and want and focused in pursuing these. However, I have fallen in love with Brazil and Brazilians later in life and think I would have moved there if that coup de foudre had happened in my early 30s, but I have very precious friendships and have had some wonderful adventures there. I could say a lot more about the things I shouldn’t have pursued!

What’s your favourite play or piece of theatre?

I was talking about this with a colleague just the other week and we both agreed that Robert Lepage’s Dragon Trilogy at the Tramway was a transformational theatrical moment for both of us, that it bound us permanently and passionately to the world of theatre as audiences and professionals.

What do you like the best about working in the arts?

Being the privileged witness to that first moment of encounter between the art and the audience, be it a play, a dance piece, an exhibition, a film premier, a musical commission or newborn song. To feel, the pride, the curiosity, the fear and the anticipation invested in that moment and the sense that what we are doing matters even if it doesn’t always work out.

What advice would you give emerging female practitioners in the arts today?

What can I say? I’m still learning but I reflect a lot on the value of what I do with my colleagues and indeed on how to do it. I laugh a lot too. As a woman working in the arts I think you have to develop complex combinations of attitude or artistry – for example integrity of purpose and steeliness of will, expansiveness of mind and intensive attention to detail. Most important though, is learning how to sit in complexity of all kinds, until the right idea evolves. I think women are good at that, at avoiding the orthodoxies and looking for the real answer not the right one.

Who would your Stellar Quine of the month be and why?

You’ve featured some of the Stellar Quines in my life already and I work and have fun with some truly wonderful women. Can I give a collaborative answer and nominate the four stellar festival directors/Executive Directors I work with – Kath Mainland, Joanna Baker, Sorcha Carey and Julie Weston. I learn from and relish them all.

Faith Liddell was recently awarded an OBE for Services to the Arts in the New Years Honours List 2015.

 

 

 

 

Fiona Sturgeon Shea

How would you describe your current job and what do you like best about it?

As Creative Director, I am responsible for the overall leadership of the organisation which supports, develops and promotes Scotland’s playwrights. A great deal of my work right now is making and nurturing our partnerships – with playwrights, obviously, but also with theatre companies, academic institutions, funding bodies and others – here in Scotland, the UK and internationally. We are governed by a great board of directors made up of professional playwrights and other skilled professionals. And I’m supported by a talented and industrious small team in Emma Mckee, our General Manager, and Emma Campbell, our Communications and Administration Co-ordinator.

I love my job. It is an absolute privilege to work with playwrights in the way that I am able to. It’s a great honour to have people share their stories and their work with me, often when they are still raw and unformed – and to be invited into the different processes that playwrights practice. I never underestimate what a gift this is.

You were recently in Canada – what are your thoughts on the artistic links between Scotland and Canada?

We are part of an international network of playwright development centres across the world. Canada has a particularly strong tradition of this. We would love to work more regularly with our Canadian colleagues and that was part of the reason for my research trip.

Playwrights’ Studio was originally modeled on Centre De Auteurs Dramatiques, the Playwrights’ Workshop Montreal (and others). I wanted to check in with these organisations to compare our models and our activities, hear fresh thinking and discover innovative approaches to developing plays from experienced colleagues. Our Canadian peers were very open to hearing about our work. Playwrights supporting one another through mentoring is something that we are particularly strong on in Scotland. Obviously, I was also there to promote Scotland’s playwrights and was really heartened to discover that awareness is still very high. I saw posters of plays I had worked on at the Traverse and elsewhere in new Canadian productions adorning the walls of many theatre companies.

Our international work is designed to complement that of producing new writing companies like Stellar Quines and the Traverse whose work with Canadian artists has been exemplary. So, watch this space – or rather www.playwrightsstudio.co.uk!

What was your first ever job?

My father was a professional artist so I grew up in a family business. I worked in our art gallery and shop from a very early age. It didn’t pay very well and I doubt if I was a model employee!

My first full-time job was Marketing Assistant at the Lyceum Theatre in Edinburgh. This is where I met Tom McGrath when he was Associate Literary Director (for the whole of Scotland but based at the Lyceum). Tom felt that I was wasting my brain stuffing envelopes for most of the day – which really was the main job of a Marketing Assistant in the pre-Internet dark ages – and would give me scripts to read instead. That first year at the Lyceum was very important in giving me a real understanding of how a professional producing theatre works. Doing things as basic as gathering biogs for the programmes helped me understand the different roles and contribution people made.

Has there been a particular person or an opportunity that you feel has made the most difference to your career?

Tom McGrath was one of the most inspiring and supportive people I knew – even when we were arguing about things! He had such an influence on so many people – and still does through the Tom McGrath Trust. Another person I met at the Lyceum was Faith Liddell (now Chief Executive of Festivals Edinburgh). She and Tom were the people who believed in me and recognised potential in me that I didn’t necessarily see myself.

What has been your favourite theatre production?

Oh gosh, there are too many to choose from! The one production I will mention was Sarasine by the theatre company Gloria, adapted by Neil Bartlett from Balzac’s story. I saw it in the old Traverse and I’ll never forget Bette Bourne’s entrance (in complete blackout) as a 300 year old castrati. It was so brilliant, powerful and atmospheric, it’s really stayed with me.

What do you like the best about working within theatre?

It’s really always been about the playwrights for me – even when I was working as I did for many years in Audience Development. I loved what we achieved at the Traverse in the 1990s, spending a really significant amount of time with the playwright to communicate their intentions about the play in a way which also met the audience’s expectations. The playwright Nicola McCartney says that what I used to do was dramaturgy through marketing. That always makes me smile.

Who would your Stellar Quine of the month be and why?

Ella Wildridge the translator and dramaturg and patron of the Tom McGrath Trust – the woman is a genius. She’s inexhaustible and puts me to shame with her energy, ideas and the fact that she’s always learning.

 

Sylvia Dow

How would you describe your current job and what do you like best about it?

As a playwright I’ve found that writing, although it can be frustrating, and the stuff of sleepless nights, is also marvelously liberating and satisfying. Especially writing for theatre.

What do you consider your best work and why?

I’m never entirely happy with anything – always worrying away at the work, striving to make it better. But I enjoyed working on my play for Stellar Quines the most. The development and research period of THREADS was such a joy, driving round the Borders with Stellar Quines’ wonder-woman Muriel Romanes, delving into archives, and talking to gallus Borders women-who-knit.

What was your first ever job?

I had a few wee jobs when we lived abroad – bookstore, dime store, that kind of thing but my first proper job was as a teacher of drama in Bo’ness Academy. I still direct their annual school show.

What was the contact/opportunity/job offer that you feel has made the most difference to your career?

Two really- Selma Dimitrijevic, the playwright and director who directed and toured my first play. And Stellar Quines, which has been so important to so many female playwrights. Can I have three? Because being part of the Traverse 50 was also huge for me.

What’s the biggest opportunity that you missed or wished you had taken up but didn’t?

Wish I had started writing 30 years ago. Being old when I began means I am always playing catch-up and also means that I will never, in reality, actually catch up!

What has been your favourite theatre production?

So many. Let me think. Ninagawa’s all male production of Medea at the Edinburgh Festival in 1992 knocked me sideways.

What do you like the best about working in theatre?

I love theatre makers – actors, directors, writers. I love being in their company and I am in awe of the magic they make.

What advice would you give emerging female practitioners in theatre today?

I read an interview with the writer/poet/rapper Kate Tempest in which she said the important thing is to ‘do the work, and get it out there’. Both of these are hard but you’ve got to keep at it. And see work whenever and wherever you can. So that you never stop learning.

Who would your Stellar Quine of the month be and why?

I think most of my Quine-heroines may well have already been featured, but I’d choose an icon of Scottish Theatre, still working hard, still delighting us, Una MacLean.

 

 

Extracts from Little Forks and The Dark Twin

Rebecca Sharp's typewriter

Rebecca Sharp is hard at work on the scripts for Little Forks and The Dark Twin, which she’ll be presenting at our up and coming Rehearsal Room at the end of October.

She’s kindly sent us some exclusive extracts of the work to give a flavour of what to expect – enjoy!

Little Forks extract:
I want to find the Homestead but I want to find it first. I have to lose Hecate. I send her off to look for pinecones, then I dash between the trees and out of sight.

I keep running, lightly, holding my breath, until I think I’ve come to the Clearing. I stop and spin round, then pounce a little way up the slope to look down.

Tha mi a’ faicinn an fhèidh –
I see the deer.

My first thought is my knife, feel it keen in my pocket. I creep towards the body; sweetly still, dead still. I imagine it fell but since then has been got-at.

I look closer, the neck wound is a door ajar and I so badly want in.

I don’t know how much time has passed, but I feel the shift – geometry sawn up and rolled out over pine needles, my knife at home in its purpose. My pulse darts through me and now has somewhere to go. A separation – but it still isn’t telling me.

Carson a tha thu a’ toirt orm seo a dhèanamh?
Carson a dh’innis thu na sgeulachdan dhomh?

I don’t hear Hec until she’s already stopped and staring. Not a house.

The eyes are frozen windows, it can’t give any more of itself away. I know I have to dig in. Is that what I have to do?

A kick and a few incisions, the crunching sound is sadly small.

The Dark Twin extract:

I had fire.

I remember; I did have it.

I met Marion, I moved;
I let something go.
Or something left.

No – I moved, something was left;
I met Marion.

No – something stopped, as in ended;
I met…

No.

I had fire.

55 degrees, 52 minutes, 21.65 seconds North,
by 4 degrees, 18 minutes, 10.56 seconds West.