Jemima Levick and The 306: Day writer Oliver Emanuel discuss women & war with The Herald

“What struck me about the first part,” says Levick, “was that it was about these vulnerable men, and the second is about strong women. In the first play, the men were led to their death, and were effectively shot after being led astray by the government. In part two, we see how women begin the peace process, and how, rather than being just about the home front, it was women who begin acting to try and stop the war.”

“The play started off as a historical drama,” says Emanuel, “and we thought it might run the risk of ending up being about something arcane and old fashioned. Since then, the rise of Donald Trump has prompted this angry upsurge from women protesting, and who are singing out for equality and peace, and suddenly it felt like we were doing something that was about today.”

“The time the play is set in is when women’s emancipation began,” says Levick, “and that was hugely affected by everything else that was going on. Would women have got the vote without the war? We don’t know, but The 306: Day is a deeply personal story about how these women work out their survival techniques in extraordinary times.”

Read Neil Cooper’s full article in the Herald.